A Knight’s Peril is an interactive investigation set in 1387 with the fourteenth-century castle’s deadly secrets at its heart.Visitors on the quest must listen to their guide, Kate Dallingridge, and decide who to follow, trust or accuse as part of a mission to save the life of Sir Edward Dallingridge, her father and the influential owner of Bodiam Castle.
A Knight’s Peril makes use of an ‘Echo Horn’ (pictured below) which helps visitors to sound the echoes of the past trapped inside the castle’s ancient walls. These objects surreptitiously house cutting edge hardware and interactive software that responds to choices made by visitors, activating the appropriate audio scenes when touched to special seals hidden around the castle.

Inspired by the ‘choose your own adventure’ model, A Knight’s Peril introduces four main suspects based loosely on historic personalities and medieval hierarchy. Using the echo horn and the adventure map (pictured below), players must investigate each suspect, using the 12 year old Kate as their guide, to uncover who has deadly intentions for Sir Edward.
The fictional story uses a mix of both real and imagined characters informed by research carried out by the University of the West of England. The Earl of Arundel and Prioress De Lisle were real people connected to Bodiam Castle and East Sussex. In A Knight’s Peril the former, the most powerful man in England at the time, is portrayed as the puppet master of the King, whilst the latter is given a character of a devout but highly ambitious woman in a man’s world.
“Bodiam Castle is already a great place for adventure, but we hope the introduction of A Knight’s Peril will bring our atmospheric castle to life even more. It adds authentic voices, sounds and plausible plots from medieval England to our existing programme of events, medieval characters and demonstrations.”

Heather Packham, visitor experience manager at Bodiam Castle

A Knight’s Peril is an interactive investigation set in 1387 with the fourteenth-century castle’s deadly secrets at its heart.

Visitors on the quest must listen to their guide, Kate Dallingridge, and decide who to follow, trust or accuse as part of a mission to save the life of Sir Edward Dallingridge, her father and the influential owner of Bodiam Castle.



A Knight’s Peril makes use of an ‘Echo Horn’ (pictured below) which helps visitors to sound the echoes of the past trapped inside the castle’s ancient walls. These objects surreptitiously house cutting edge hardware and interactive software that responds to choices made by visitors, activating the appropriate audio scenes when touched to special seals hidden around the castle.

image

Inspired by the ‘choose your own adventure’ model, A Knight’s Peril introduces four main suspects based loosely on historic personalities and medieval hierarchy. Using the echo horn and the adventure map (pictured below), players must investigate each suspect, using the 12 year old Kate as their guide, to uncover who has deadly intentions for Sir Edward.


The fictional story uses a mix of both real and imagined characters informed by research carried out by the University of the West of England. The Earl of Arundel and Prioress De Lisle were real people connected to Bodiam Castle and East Sussex. In A Knight’s Peril the former, the most powerful man in England at the time, is portrayed as the puppet master of the King, whilst the latter is given a character of a devout but highly ambitious woman in a man’s world.


“Bodiam Castle is already a great place for adventure, but we hope the introduction of A Knight’s Peril will bring our atmospheric castle to life even more. It adds authentic voices, sounds and plausible plots from medieval England to our existing programme of events, medieval characters and demonstrations.”


Heather Packham, visitor experience manager at Bodiam Castle

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* PURVEYORS OF FINE EXPERIENCES *
We like to create a bit of a splash; something that is remarkable, something that inspires excitement, intrigue and wonder in participants.  This could take the form of mass participation events, theatrical encounters, pervasive or street games – you name it, we’ve done it.
When you experience something incredible you want to tell your friends about it – the splash has a ripple effect as people hear about what happened. This is where technology and analytics come in – to understand and measure the impact – and to help it ripple even further.
Splash & Ripple is a unique and innovative experience maker – spanning real and digital worlds.
Get in touch
Follow us
And while you’re here, why not take a look at some of the work we’ve done in the last few years? Click the thumbnails below to find out more

* PURVEYORS OF FINE EXPERIENCES *

We like to create a bit of a splash; something that is remarkable, something that inspires excitement, intrigue and wonder in participants.  This could take the form of mass participation events, theatrical encounters, pervasive or street games – you name it, we’ve done it.

When you experience something incredible you want to tell your friends about it – the splash has a ripple effect as people hear about what happened. This is where technology and analytics come in – to understand and measure the impact – and to help it ripple even further.

Splash & Ripple is a unique and innovative experience maker – spanning real and digital worlds.

Get in touch

Follow us

And while you’re here, why not take a look at some of the work we’ve done in the last few years? Click the thumbnails below to find out more


Dare you face your worst fears?
An ancient darkness is rising upwards from the old places beneath Bristol.  Bad things are happening. People are missing. Nightmares are becoming real. Dare you face your worst fears to find out what’s going on and escape the night unscathed?
Shadows Follow was Splash & Ripple’s ambitious first production – a psychological thriller experience for 130 participants designed to tap into the heart of people’s fears.  The audience were given a mission to aid Dr Winterwell in his search for his missing daughter Persephone and investigate a series of recent disappearances in the ancient back streets of old Bristol.  An intensely cinematic world was created through using incredible locations that made the most of Bristol’s most secret corners and terrifying ancient underground places.  Evading shadows to find clues, the tension grew as they got closer to the heart of the evil mystery and interacted with more characters until the story climaxed in an astonishing final scene.
This unique experience was designed with a powerful mix of interactive theatre infused with game play which gave the audience agency to effect the outcome of events rather than passively watch them happen. Further layers of involvement were created as the story unfolded over @splashandripple ‘s twitter feed during and after the game and players added their own interpretations of the story along with photos using #shadowsfollow.

Dare you face your worst fears?

An ancient darkness is rising upwards from the old places beneath Bristol.  Bad things are happening. People are missing. Nightmares are becoming real. Dare you face your worst fears to find out what’s going on and escape the night unscathed?

Shadows Follow was Splash & Ripple’s ambitious first production – a psychological thriller experience for 130 participants designed to tap into the heart of people’s fears.  The audience were given a mission to aid Dr Winterwell in his search for his missing daughter Persephone and investigate a series of recent disappearances in the ancient back streets of old Bristol.  An intensely cinematic world was created through using incredible locations that made the most of Bristol’s most secret corners and terrifying ancient underground places.  Evading shadows to find clues, the tension grew as they got closer to the heart of the evil mystery and interacted with more characters until the story climaxed in an astonishing final scene.

This unique experience was designed with a powerful mix of interactive theatre infused with game play which gave the audience agency to effect the outcome of events rather than passively watch them happen. Further layers of involvement were created as the story unfolded over @splashandripple ‘s twitter feed during and after the game and players added their own interpretations of the story along with photos using #shadowsfollow.


What happens to people when you take away their freedom, their control and their responsibility?
Across three nights in Bristol, HMP Frogmarsh opened its doors to a new intake of 300 ‘fish’ (that’s new prisoners to you and me) in a game-powered immersive theatre performance.
WIth a crew of 70, including probably about 50 performers, for an audience of about 100 a night this was surely the definition of a crowd made production.  Everyone worked for free with funds raised being donated to Amnesty and the Prison Reform Trust.
The project was the vision of the frankly marvellous Lydia Coen Mason who brought an unlikely but ultimately flipping brilliant crew of people together to run 3 nights of unique experiential theatre with a Kafkaesque feel.
Prison Break began with the audience being sentenced by a judge, put into uniforms, photographed and processed into small prisoner groups and assigned a prison guard.  They were then transported via prison bus to HMP Frogmarsh – a specially constructed prison with cells, a canteen, visitors centre, workshop, interrogation room, and exercise yard. Prisoners were escorted about the prison by their guard and experienced a series of different interactions with the old lags, all the while trying to ascertain when the Prison Break would happen and where the escape would be from. The aim of the game was to escape without being caught at the final climatic mass jail break.
The aesthetic, the hierarchical structure, the systematised and sometimes boring routine of the prison were designed to put the audience into the world of prison life.  This wasn’t parody or pure entertainment; our writers had been or worked in prisons and this needed to taste real. Part theatre, part social experiment, we didn’t know how the audience would react until the first night – the feedback was interesting – they wanted the guards to be tougher.  In rehearsals, highly conscious of the outcome of the Stanford Prison experiment, we’d been very careful drawing the line with how guards behaved, but we realised we were being too nice and it didn’t reflect the tough world of prison life.  So on the second night we stepped it up a gear – with brilliant results, now the prisoners had something to rebel against the atmosphere was electric – and we found ourselves in a near riot-situation toward the end of the night and the game mechanic started to break down (although no one but us noticed that bit!)
By night 3 with a bunch of new game elements, including a new bonus scene called “Paradise” for prisoners to escape to if they broke early, we were sailing – the atmosphere was still electric but game also worked beautifully, and the performers were so into their characters it was hard to get them out of it at the end of the night.
Feedback at the after party was great – people had really had a taste of prison life and also managed to break out or get caught trying – which was always going to be fun.
Big credit to all of the incredible performers and crew (too numerous to list), Artspace Lifespace College for letting us build a prison on their grounds and of course to Lydia (the Guv) who had the genius to make it happen.

What happens to people when you take away their freedom, their control and their responsibility?

Across three nights in Bristol, HMP Frogmarsh opened its doors to a new intake of 300 ‘fish’ (that’s new prisoners to you and me) in a game-powered immersive theatre performance.

WIth a crew of 70, including probably about 50 performers, for an audience of about 100 a night this was surely the definition of a crowd made production.  Everyone worked for free with funds raised being donated to Amnesty and the Prison Reform Trust.

The project was the vision of the frankly marvellous Lydia Coen Mason who brought an unlikely but ultimately flipping brilliant crew of people together to run 3 nights of unique experiential theatre with a Kafkaesque feel.

Prison Break began with the audience being sentenced by a judge, put into uniforms, photographed and processed into small prisoner groups and assigned a prison guard.  They were then transported via prison bus to HMP Frogmarsh – a specially constructed prison with cells, a canteen, visitors centre, workshop, interrogation room, and exercise yard. Prisoners were escorted about the prison by their guard and experienced a series of different interactions with the old lags, all the while trying to ascertain when the Prison Break would happen and where the escape would be from. The aim of the game was to escape without being caught at the final climatic mass jail break.

The aesthetic, the hierarchical structure, the systematised and sometimes boring routine of the prison were designed to put the audience into the world of prison life.  This wasn’t parody or pure entertainment; our writers had been or worked in prisons and this needed to taste real. Part theatre, part social experiment, we didn’t know how the audience would react until the first night – the feedback was interesting – they wanted the guards to be tougher.  In rehearsals, highly conscious of the outcome of the Stanford Prison experiment, we’d been very careful drawing the line with how guards behaved, but we realised we were being too nice and it didn’t reflect the tough world of prison life.  So on the second night we stepped it up a gear – with brilliant results, now the prisoners had something to rebel against the atmosphere was electric – and we found ourselves in a near riot-situation toward the end of the night and the game mechanic started to break down (although no one but us noticed that bit!)

By night 3 with a bunch of new game elements, including a new bonus scene called “Paradise” for prisoners to escape to if they broke early, we were sailing – the atmosphere was still electric but game also worked beautifully, and the performers were so into their characters it was hard to get them out of it at the end of the night.

Feedback at the after party was great – people had really had a taste of prison life and also managed to break out or get caught trying – which was always going to be fun.

Big credit to all of the incredible performers and crew (too numerous to list), Artspace Lifespace College for letting us build a prison on their grounds and of course to Lydia (the Guv) who had the genius to make it happen.


We’re very proud to announce this concept was shortlisted for the Playable City Award. The Balloonometer is a project designed to help people rediscover their playful spirit. We thought about the drab urban everyday that most of us live amongst and we thought about how, with one simple fun and unexpected interruption to this a person’s day and perception of their city can be transformed.
So we went symbolic on this one – taking the whimsical giant balloon as the symbol of play, and placing it amongst the urban fabric of scaffolding to show that the potential for play is everywhere and in everyone.The installation, dropped into a busy part of the city, invites audiences to become players and work collaboratively: a balloon is released into the enclosed scaffold structure and players must move the balloons using giant fans towards one of two containers – a safe house and a container with spikes.  They decide between them which end they’ll chose for the balloon.Players move the balloon using fans which are controlled via a variety of technologies from calling a number and blowing down the phone to keep the fan going, to microphones embedded into the structure or sensors that require arm flapping to keep the balloon moving in the right direction.The rules are simple and require no descriptive explanation. The goal, the aim and the reward are in clear sight at all times. It is not possible to complete the task alone, so collaboration and communication between strangers become key.
This project has been developed in collaboration with our buddies at Ludic rooms, here is a blog about how we met & here is their natty little blurb:Ludic Rooms
Transforming spaces through technology and play, Ludic Rooms work has at its heart a participatory approach. All our work is interactive, enabling the audience to co-create and author their own interpretation. We play with technology in the real world to create a unique individual experience.

We’re very proud to announce this concept was shortlisted for the Playable City Award. The Balloonometer is a project designed to help people rediscover their playful spirit. We thought about the drab urban everyday that most of us live amongst and we thought about how, with one simple fun and unexpected interruption to this a person’s day and perception of their city can be transformed.

So we went symbolic on this one – taking the whimsical giant balloon as the symbol of play, and placing it amongst the urban fabric of scaffolding to show that the potential for play is everywhere and in everyone.

The installation, dropped into a busy part of the city, invites audiences to become players and work collaboratively: a balloon is released into the enclosed scaffold structure and players must move the balloons using giant fans towards one of two containers – a safe house and a container with spikes.  They decide between them which end they’ll chose for the balloon.
Players move the balloon using fans which are controlled via a variety of technologies from calling a number and blowing down the phone to keep the fan going, to microphones embedded into the structure or sensors that require arm flapping to keep the balloon moving in the right direction.
The rules are simple and require no descriptive explanation. The goal, the aim and the reward are in clear sight at all times. It is not possible to complete the task alone, so collaboration and communication between strangers become key.


This project has been developed in collaboration with our buddies at Ludic rooms, here is a blog about how we met & here is their natty little blurb:
Ludic Rooms
Transforming spaces through technology and play, Ludic Rooms work has at its heart a participatory approach. All our work is interactive, enabling the audience to co-create and author their own interpretation. We play with technology in the real world to create a unique individual experience.



Museums and galleries are continually looking for new ways to engage audiences and deepen the visitor experience. National Museums Scotland may have just taken things to the next level with an innovative on-site experience called Capture The Museum.
It’s a tense, physical team game: visitors explore galleries with mobiles in hand to seek out exhibits, solve puzzles and claim territories to beat their opponents. It’s a far cry from what you might expect to find in such an august institution – but that’s exactly why National Museums hope it will appeal to new audiences. Hugh Wallace, National Museums’ Head of Digital Media, describes the game: “It’s a genuinely exciting addition to the museum experience and one that makes totally different use of the space. Innovating in such a complex building was always going to be challenging but I’m thrilled about what we’ve come out with. No-one has done anything like this before.”
Visitors download an app to their smartphone and sign up to either the Red or Blue clan; the game can accommodate up to 50 players at a time. The two sides plan their strategies then spread out across the National Museum of Scotland. A map that updates in real-time shows which clan owns which ‘territories’ – the differently themed galleries in the Museum.
Players scan into territories using their phone’s camera, where they prove their understanding of the exhibits to earn the high score. After 30 fast and furious minutes the clan with the most territories is crowned the winner. Capture was the product of a research and development fund from the Technology Strategy Board, seeking new ways to enhance visitor engagement. Bristol play specialists Thought Den devised and created the game, enlisting fellow Bristol startups Splash & Ripple for their experience creating street games.
Ben Templeton, Creative Director for Thought Den, said: “We wanted to create an experience that is ‘heads-up’ – engaging people with the space, not just the screen on their phone. The live aspect of the game was designed to appeal to a new generation of museum-goers who have come to expect immersive media experiences. Why shouldn’t museums be the place to give them that?”
The app was built using HTML5 and JavaScript so it can be made available for the majority of smartphones. For launch the app can be downloaded on iOS only and an Android version will follow.
See www.capturethemuseum.com for more information.
Want to know even more? Hear Rosie and Ben talk about it in the video below:

Museums and galleries are continually looking for new ways to engage audiences and deepen the visitor experience. National Museums Scotland may have just taken things to the next level with an innovative on-site experience called Capture The Museum.

It’s a tense, physical team game: visitors explore galleries with mobiles in hand to seek out exhibits, solve puzzles and claim territories to beat their opponents. It’s a far cry from what you might expect to find in such an august institution – but that’s exactly why National Museums hope it will appeal to new audiences. Hugh Wallace, National Museums’ Head of Digital Media, describes the game: “It’s a genuinely exciting addition to the museum experience and one that makes totally different use of the space. Innovating in such a complex building was always going to be challenging but I’m thrilled about what we’ve come out with. No-one has done anything like this before.”

Visitors download an app to their smartphone and sign up to either the Red or Blue clan; the game can accommodate up to 50 players at a time. The two sides plan their strategies then spread out across the National Museum of Scotland. A map that updates in real-time shows which clan owns which ‘territories’ – the differently themed galleries in the Museum.

Players scan into territories using their phone’s camera, where they prove their understanding of the exhibits to earn the high score. After 30 fast and furious minutes the clan with the most territories is crowned the winner. Capture was the product of a research and development fund from the Technology Strategy Board, seeking new ways to enhance visitor engagement. Bristol play specialists Thought Den devised and created the game, enlisting fellow Bristol startups Splash & Ripple for their experience creating street games.

Ben Templeton, Creative Director for Thought Den, said: “We wanted to create an experience that is ‘heads-up’ – engaging people with the space, not just the screen on their phone. The live aspect of the game was designed to appeal to a new generation of museum-goers who have come to expect immersive media experiences. Why shouldn’t museums be the place to give them that?”

The app was built using HTML5 and JavaScript so it can be made available for the majority of smartphones. For launch the app can be downloaded on iOS only and an Android version will follow.

See www.capturethemuseum.com for more information.

Want to know even more? Hear Rosie and Ben talk about it in the video below:



Incitement is a 2 hour theatrical street game that throws the audience into the middle of a dystopian present world ruled by an Authority which knows everything about you and uses this to make your decisions for you (think 1984 in the Google age).
IN A WORLD WHERE….
BOOKS ARE BURNT MEMORIES ARE ALTERED CREATIVITY IS SUBCERSIVE & LOVE IS A COMMODITY
WHAT WOULD IT TAKE TO FIND YOUR VOICE?
The player audience joins one of four rebellious factions in their struggle to overthrow the Authority, but first they must compete in an underground inter-faction competition to decide who will get the all important “Platform’ to get their message heard by the masses.
All this must be done in stealth – the Authority’s watchful eyes are everywhere and anyone could be an informant.

The production has been inspired both by fantastic literature that has played with the theme of resistance to control and the extraordinary reawakening of crowd power across the world  in recent times; often enabled by social media. Facebook, Twitter and mobile phones will be key to the narrative of the experience both in the run up and during the game when text messaging and clever phone tech will be used.
Spread across the cityscape the gameplay involves plenty of sneaking, a bit of chasing and the need for stealthy tactics.
The use of theatre and an in depth back story creates a truly immersive game world where the audience’s actions, individually and collectively, affect the outcome of the experience; and we really don’t know which way it will go in the final rabble-rousing scene!
Incitement premiered in September 2012 as a headline game in Bristol’s Igfest on 8th Sep and London’s Hide & Seek Weekender on 15th Sep.

Incitement is a 2 hour theatrical street game that throws the audience into the middle of a dystopian present world ruled by an Authority which knows everything about you and uses this to make your decisions for you (think 1984 in the Google age).

IN A WORLD WHERE….

BOOKS ARE BURNT
MEMORIES ARE ALTERED
CREATIVITY IS SUBCERSIVE
& LOVE IS A COMMODITY

WHAT WOULD IT TAKE TO FIND YOUR VOICE?

The player audience joins one of four rebellious factions in their struggle to overthrow the Authority, but first they must compete in an underground inter-faction competition to decide who will get the all important “Platform’ to get their message heard by the masses.

All this must be done in stealth – the Authority’s watchful eyes are everywhere and anyone could be an informant.

The production has been inspired both by fantastic literature that has played with the theme of resistance to control and the extraordinary reawakening of crowd power across the world  in recent times; often enabled by social media. Facebook, Twitter and mobile phones will be key to the narrative of the experience both in the run up and during the game when text messaging and clever phone tech will be used.

Spread across the cityscape the gameplay involves plenty of sneaking, a bit of chasing and the need for stealthy tactics.

The use of theatre and an in depth back story creates a truly immersive game world where the audience’s actions, individually and collectively, affect the outcome of the experience; and we really don’t know which way it will go in the final rabble-rousing scene!

Incitement premiered in September 2012 as a headline game in Bristol’s Igfest on 8th Sep and London’s Hide & Seek Weekender on 15th Sep.

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When the Art Fund nominated Holburne Museum in Bath first spoke to us about making a ‘mobile app game’ for their rather plush Sydney Gardens we asked what we thought was the most important question: “What kind of experience do you want the audience to take away with them?” This is because as real world game designers, we believe creating an enhanced experience of a space or place should be so much more than just another mobile app for a museum. The Holburne wanted people to experience the Garden in a different way and learn something about its past.
A game is perfect for this – people learn from the choices they make – but the real art is in also enabling them to understand the space on their own terms through a powerful experience which they are in control of. Our aim is to get under people’s skin – we create gen-u-ine, grade A, real experiences that effect people, with content that grabs them, brings them together and gives them something to go home and tell their mothers about. We do this through creating great stories with spectacle and drama at their heart that put people in the moment through creating genuine, visceral reaction.
Ghosts in the Garden saw Splash & Ripple injecting a flavour of this real-world viscerality into an intricately crafted audio geo-locative game. Present-day visitors meet and interact with real characters from the Gardens’ heyday, in a unique experience where history and imaginative play meet head-on.

Ghosts in the Garden - REACT 2012 from Silicon19 on Vimeo.

When the Art Fund nominated Holburne Museum in Bath first spoke to us about making a ‘mobile app game’ for their rather plush Sydney Gardens we asked what we thought was the most important question: “What kind of experience do you want the audience to take away with them?” This is because as real world game designers, we believe creating an enhanced experience of a space or place should be so much more than just another mobile app for a museum. The Holburne wanted people to experience the Garden in a different way and learn something about its past.

A game is perfect for this – people learn from the choices they make – but the real art is in also enabling them to understand the space on their own terms through a powerful experience which they are in control of. Our aim is to get under people’s skin – we create gen-u-ine, grade A, real experiences that effect people, with content that grabs them, brings them together and gives them something to go home and tell their mothers about. We do this through creating great stories with spectacle and drama at their heart that put people in the moment through creating genuine, visceral reaction.

Ghosts in the Garden saw Splash & Ripple injecting a flavour of this real-world viscerality into an intricately crafted audio geo-locative game. Present-day visitors meet and interact with real characters from the Gardens’ heyday, in a unique experience where history and imaginative play meet head-on.

Ghosts in the Garden - REACT 2012 from Silicon19 on Vimeo.

A Knight’s Peril is an interactive investigation set in 1387 with the fourteenth-century castle’s deadly secrets at its heart.Visitors on the quest must listen to their guide, Kate Dallingridge, and decide who to follow, trust or accuse as part of a mission to save the life of Sir Edward Dallingridge, her father and the influential owner of Bodiam Castle.
A Knight’s Peril makes use of an ‘Echo Horn’ (pictured below) which helps visitors to sound the echoes of the past trapped inside the castle’s ancient walls. These objects surreptitiously house cutting edge hardware and interactive software that responds to choices made by visitors, activating the appropriate audio scenes when touched to special seals hidden around the castle.

Inspired by the ‘choose your own adventure’ model, A Knight’s Peril introduces four main suspects based loosely on historic personalities and medieval hierarchy. Using the echo horn and the adventure map (pictured below), players must investigate each suspect, using the 12 year old Kate as their guide, to uncover who has deadly intentions for Sir Edward.
The fictional story uses a mix of both real and imagined characters informed by research carried out by the University of the West of England. The Earl of Arundel and Prioress De Lisle were real people connected to Bodiam Castle and East Sussex. In A Knight’s Peril the former, the most powerful man in England at the time, is portrayed as the puppet master of the King, whilst the latter is given a character of a devout but highly ambitious woman in a man’s world.
“Bodiam Castle is already a great place for adventure, but we hope the introduction of A Knight’s Peril will bring our atmospheric castle to life even more. It adds authentic voices, sounds and plausible plots from medieval England to our existing programme of events, medieval characters and demonstrations.”

Heather Packham, visitor experience manager at Bodiam Castle

A Knight’s Peril is an interactive investigation set in 1387 with the fourteenth-century castle’s deadly secrets at its heart.

Visitors on the quest must listen to their guide, Kate Dallingridge, and decide who to follow, trust or accuse as part of a mission to save the life of Sir Edward Dallingridge, her father and the influential owner of Bodiam Castle.



A Knight’s Peril makes use of an ‘Echo Horn’ (pictured below) which helps visitors to sound the echoes of the past trapped inside the castle’s ancient walls. These objects surreptitiously house cutting edge hardware and interactive software that responds to choices made by visitors, activating the appropriate audio scenes when touched to special seals hidden around the castle.

image

Inspired by the ‘choose your own adventure’ model, A Knight’s Peril introduces four main suspects based loosely on historic personalities and medieval hierarchy. Using the echo horn and the adventure map (pictured below), players must investigate each suspect, using the 12 year old Kate as their guide, to uncover who has deadly intentions for Sir Edward.


The fictional story uses a mix of both real and imagined characters informed by research carried out by the University of the West of England. The Earl of Arundel and Prioress De Lisle were real people connected to Bodiam Castle and East Sussex. In A Knight’s Peril the former, the most powerful man in England at the time, is portrayed as the puppet master of the King, whilst the latter is given a character of a devout but highly ambitious woman in a man’s world.


“Bodiam Castle is already a great place for adventure, but we hope the introduction of A Knight’s Peril will bring our atmospheric castle to life even more. It adds authentic voices, sounds and plausible plots from medieval England to our existing programme of events, medieval characters and demonstrations.”


Heather Packham, visitor experience manager at Bodiam Castle

image

image

image

* PURVEYORS OF FINE EXPERIENCES *
We like to create a bit of a splash; something that is remarkable, something that inspires excitement, intrigue and wonder in participants.  This could take the form of mass participation events, theatrical encounters, pervasive or street games – you name it, we’ve done it.
When you experience something incredible you want to tell your friends about it – the splash has a ripple effect as people hear about what happened. This is where technology and analytics come in – to understand and measure the impact – and to help it ripple even further.
Splash & Ripple is a unique and innovative experience maker – spanning real and digital worlds.
Get in touch
Follow us
And while you’re here, why not take a look at some of the work we’ve done in the last few years? Click the thumbnails below to find out more

* PURVEYORS OF FINE EXPERIENCES *

We like to create a bit of a splash; something that is remarkable, something that inspires excitement, intrigue and wonder in participants.  This could take the form of mass participation events, theatrical encounters, pervasive or street games – you name it, we’ve done it.

When you experience something incredible you want to tell your friends about it – the splash has a ripple effect as people hear about what happened. This is where technology and analytics come in – to understand and measure the impact – and to help it ripple even further.

Splash & Ripple is a unique and innovative experience maker – spanning real and digital worlds.

Get in touch

Follow us

And while you’re here, why not take a look at some of the work we’ve done in the last few years? Click the thumbnails below to find out more


Dare you face your worst fears?
An ancient darkness is rising upwards from the old places beneath Bristol.  Bad things are happening. People are missing. Nightmares are becoming real. Dare you face your worst fears to find out what’s going on and escape the night unscathed?
Shadows Follow was Splash & Ripple’s ambitious first production – a psychological thriller experience for 130 participants designed to tap into the heart of people’s fears.  The audience were given a mission to aid Dr Winterwell in his search for his missing daughter Persephone and investigate a series of recent disappearances in the ancient back streets of old Bristol.  An intensely cinematic world was created through using incredible locations that made the most of Bristol’s most secret corners and terrifying ancient underground places.  Evading shadows to find clues, the tension grew as they got closer to the heart of the evil mystery and interacted with more characters until the story climaxed in an astonishing final scene.
This unique experience was designed with a powerful mix of interactive theatre infused with game play which gave the audience agency to effect the outcome of events rather than passively watch them happen. Further layers of involvement were created as the story unfolded over @splashandripple ‘s twitter feed during and after the game and players added their own interpretations of the story along with photos using #shadowsfollow.

Dare you face your worst fears?

An ancient darkness is rising upwards from the old places beneath Bristol.  Bad things are happening. People are missing. Nightmares are becoming real. Dare you face your worst fears to find out what’s going on and escape the night unscathed?

Shadows Follow was Splash & Ripple’s ambitious first production – a psychological thriller experience for 130 participants designed to tap into the heart of people’s fears.  The audience were given a mission to aid Dr Winterwell in his search for his missing daughter Persephone and investigate a series of recent disappearances in the ancient back streets of old Bristol.  An intensely cinematic world was created through using incredible locations that made the most of Bristol’s most secret corners and terrifying ancient underground places.  Evading shadows to find clues, the tension grew as they got closer to the heart of the evil mystery and interacted with more characters until the story climaxed in an astonishing final scene.

This unique experience was designed with a powerful mix of interactive theatre infused with game play which gave the audience agency to effect the outcome of events rather than passively watch them happen. Further layers of involvement were created as the story unfolded over @splashandripple ‘s twitter feed during and after the game and players added their own interpretations of the story along with photos using #shadowsfollow.


What happens to people when you take away their freedom, their control and their responsibility?
Across three nights in Bristol, HMP Frogmarsh opened its doors to a new intake of 300 ‘fish’ (that’s new prisoners to you and me) in a game-powered immersive theatre performance.
WIth a crew of 70, including probably about 50 performers, for an audience of about 100 a night this was surely the definition of a crowd made production.  Everyone worked for free with funds raised being donated to Amnesty and the Prison Reform Trust.
The project was the vision of the frankly marvellous Lydia Coen Mason who brought an unlikely but ultimately flipping brilliant crew of people together to run 3 nights of unique experiential theatre with a Kafkaesque feel.
Prison Break began with the audience being sentenced by a judge, put into uniforms, photographed and processed into small prisoner groups and assigned a prison guard.  They were then transported via prison bus to HMP Frogmarsh – a specially constructed prison with cells, a canteen, visitors centre, workshop, interrogation room, and exercise yard. Prisoners were escorted about the prison by their guard and experienced a series of different interactions with the old lags, all the while trying to ascertain when the Prison Break would happen and where the escape would be from. The aim of the game was to escape without being caught at the final climatic mass jail break.
The aesthetic, the hierarchical structure, the systematised and sometimes boring routine of the prison were designed to put the audience into the world of prison life.  This wasn’t parody or pure entertainment; our writers had been or worked in prisons and this needed to taste real. Part theatre, part social experiment, we didn’t know how the audience would react until the first night – the feedback was interesting – they wanted the guards to be tougher.  In rehearsals, highly conscious of the outcome of the Stanford Prison experiment, we’d been very careful drawing the line with how guards behaved, but we realised we were being too nice and it didn’t reflect the tough world of prison life.  So on the second night we stepped it up a gear – with brilliant results, now the prisoners had something to rebel against the atmosphere was electric – and we found ourselves in a near riot-situation toward the end of the night and the game mechanic started to break down (although no one but us noticed that bit!)
By night 3 with a bunch of new game elements, including a new bonus scene called “Paradise” for prisoners to escape to if they broke early, we were sailing – the atmosphere was still electric but game also worked beautifully, and the performers were so into their characters it was hard to get them out of it at the end of the night.
Feedback at the after party was great – people had really had a taste of prison life and also managed to break out or get caught trying – which was always going to be fun.
Big credit to all of the incredible performers and crew (too numerous to list), Artspace Lifespace College for letting us build a prison on their grounds and of course to Lydia (the Guv) who had the genius to make it happen.

What happens to people when you take away their freedom, their control and their responsibility?

Across three nights in Bristol, HMP Frogmarsh opened its doors to a new intake of 300 ‘fish’ (that’s new prisoners to you and me) in a game-powered immersive theatre performance.

WIth a crew of 70, including probably about 50 performers, for an audience of about 100 a night this was surely the definition of a crowd made production.  Everyone worked for free with funds raised being donated to Amnesty and the Prison Reform Trust.

The project was the vision of the frankly marvellous Lydia Coen Mason who brought an unlikely but ultimately flipping brilliant crew of people together to run 3 nights of unique experiential theatre with a Kafkaesque feel.

Prison Break began with the audience being sentenced by a judge, put into uniforms, photographed and processed into small prisoner groups and assigned a prison guard.  They were then transported via prison bus to HMP Frogmarsh – a specially constructed prison with cells, a canteen, visitors centre, workshop, interrogation room, and exercise yard. Prisoners were escorted about the prison by their guard and experienced a series of different interactions with the old lags, all the while trying to ascertain when the Prison Break would happen and where the escape would be from. The aim of the game was to escape without being caught at the final climatic mass jail break.

The aesthetic, the hierarchical structure, the systematised and sometimes boring routine of the prison were designed to put the audience into the world of prison life.  This wasn’t parody or pure entertainment; our writers had been or worked in prisons and this needed to taste real. Part theatre, part social experiment, we didn’t know how the audience would react until the first night – the feedback was interesting – they wanted the guards to be tougher.  In rehearsals, highly conscious of the outcome of the Stanford Prison experiment, we’d been very careful drawing the line with how guards behaved, but we realised we were being too nice and it didn’t reflect the tough world of prison life.  So on the second night we stepped it up a gear – with brilliant results, now the prisoners had something to rebel against the atmosphere was electric – and we found ourselves in a near riot-situation toward the end of the night and the game mechanic started to break down (although no one but us noticed that bit!)

By night 3 with a bunch of new game elements, including a new bonus scene called “Paradise” for prisoners to escape to if they broke early, we were sailing – the atmosphere was still electric but game also worked beautifully, and the performers were so into their characters it was hard to get them out of it at the end of the night.

Feedback at the after party was great – people had really had a taste of prison life and also managed to break out or get caught trying – which was always going to be fun.

Big credit to all of the incredible performers and crew (too numerous to list), Artspace Lifespace College for letting us build a prison on their grounds and of course to Lydia (the Guv) who had the genius to make it happen.


We’re very proud to announce this concept was shortlisted for the Playable City Award. The Balloonometer is a project designed to help people rediscover their playful spirit. We thought about the drab urban everyday that most of us live amongst and we thought about how, with one simple fun and unexpected interruption to this a person’s day and perception of their city can be transformed.
So we went symbolic on this one – taking the whimsical giant balloon as the symbol of play, and placing it amongst the urban fabric of scaffolding to show that the potential for play is everywhere and in everyone.The installation, dropped into a busy part of the city, invites audiences to become players and work collaboratively: a balloon is released into the enclosed scaffold structure and players must move the balloons using giant fans towards one of two containers – a safe house and a container with spikes.  They decide between them which end they’ll chose for the balloon.Players move the balloon using fans which are controlled via a variety of technologies from calling a number and blowing down the phone to keep the fan going, to microphones embedded into the structure or sensors that require arm flapping to keep the balloon moving in the right direction.The rules are simple and require no descriptive explanation. The goal, the aim and the reward are in clear sight at all times. It is not possible to complete the task alone, so collaboration and communication between strangers become key.
This project has been developed in collaboration with our buddies at Ludic rooms, here is a blog about how we met & here is their natty little blurb:Ludic Rooms
Transforming spaces through technology and play, Ludic Rooms work has at its heart a participatory approach. All our work is interactive, enabling the audience to co-create and author their own interpretation. We play with technology in the real world to create a unique individual experience.

We’re very proud to announce this concept was shortlisted for the Playable City Award. The Balloonometer is a project designed to help people rediscover their playful spirit. We thought about the drab urban everyday that most of us live amongst and we thought about how, with one simple fun and unexpected interruption to this a person’s day and perception of their city can be transformed.

So we went symbolic on this one – taking the whimsical giant balloon as the symbol of play, and placing it amongst the urban fabric of scaffolding to show that the potential for play is everywhere and in everyone.

The installation, dropped into a busy part of the city, invites audiences to become players and work collaboratively: a balloon is released into the enclosed scaffold structure and players must move the balloons using giant fans towards one of two containers – a safe house and a container with spikes.  They decide between them which end they’ll chose for the balloon.
Players move the balloon using fans which are controlled via a variety of technologies from calling a number and blowing down the phone to keep the fan going, to microphones embedded into the structure or sensors that require arm flapping to keep the balloon moving in the right direction.
The rules are simple and require no descriptive explanation. The goal, the aim and the reward are in clear sight at all times. It is not possible to complete the task alone, so collaboration and communication between strangers become key.


This project has been developed in collaboration with our buddies at Ludic rooms, here is a blog about how we met & here is their natty little blurb:
Ludic Rooms
Transforming spaces through technology and play, Ludic Rooms work has at its heart a participatory approach. All our work is interactive, enabling the audience to co-create and author their own interpretation. We play with technology in the real world to create a unique individual experience.



Museums and galleries are continually looking for new ways to engage audiences and deepen the visitor experience. National Museums Scotland may have just taken things to the next level with an innovative on-site experience called Capture The Museum.
It’s a tense, physical team game: visitors explore galleries with mobiles in hand to seek out exhibits, solve puzzles and claim territories to beat their opponents. It’s a far cry from what you might expect to find in such an august institution – but that’s exactly why National Museums hope it will appeal to new audiences. Hugh Wallace, National Museums’ Head of Digital Media, describes the game: “It’s a genuinely exciting addition to the museum experience and one that makes totally different use of the space. Innovating in such a complex building was always going to be challenging but I’m thrilled about what we’ve come out with. No-one has done anything like this before.”
Visitors download an app to their smartphone and sign up to either the Red or Blue clan; the game can accommodate up to 50 players at a time. The two sides plan their strategies then spread out across the National Museum of Scotland. A map that updates in real-time shows which clan owns which ‘territories’ – the differently themed galleries in the Museum.
Players scan into territories using their phone’s camera, where they prove their understanding of the exhibits to earn the high score. After 30 fast and furious minutes the clan with the most territories is crowned the winner. Capture was the product of a research and development fund from the Technology Strategy Board, seeking new ways to enhance visitor engagement. Bristol play specialists Thought Den devised and created the game, enlisting fellow Bristol startups Splash & Ripple for their experience creating street games.
Ben Templeton, Creative Director for Thought Den, said: “We wanted to create an experience that is ‘heads-up’ – engaging people with the space, not just the screen on their phone. The live aspect of the game was designed to appeal to a new generation of museum-goers who have come to expect immersive media experiences. Why shouldn’t museums be the place to give them that?”
The app was built using HTML5 and JavaScript so it can be made available for the majority of smartphones. For launch the app can be downloaded on iOS only and an Android version will follow.
See www.capturethemuseum.com for more information.
Want to know even more? Hear Rosie and Ben talk about it in the video below:

Museums and galleries are continually looking for new ways to engage audiences and deepen the visitor experience. National Museums Scotland may have just taken things to the next level with an innovative on-site experience called Capture The Museum.

It’s a tense, physical team game: visitors explore galleries with mobiles in hand to seek out exhibits, solve puzzles and claim territories to beat their opponents. It’s a far cry from what you might expect to find in such an august institution – but that’s exactly why National Museums hope it will appeal to new audiences. Hugh Wallace, National Museums’ Head of Digital Media, describes the game: “It’s a genuinely exciting addition to the museum experience and one that makes totally different use of the space. Innovating in such a complex building was always going to be challenging but I’m thrilled about what we’ve come out with. No-one has done anything like this before.”

Visitors download an app to their smartphone and sign up to either the Red or Blue clan; the game can accommodate up to 50 players at a time. The two sides plan their strategies then spread out across the National Museum of Scotland. A map that updates in real-time shows which clan owns which ‘territories’ – the differently themed galleries in the Museum.

Players scan into territories using their phone’s camera, where they prove their understanding of the exhibits to earn the high score. After 30 fast and furious minutes the clan with the most territories is crowned the winner. Capture was the product of a research and development fund from the Technology Strategy Board, seeking new ways to enhance visitor engagement. Bristol play specialists Thought Den devised and created the game, enlisting fellow Bristol startups Splash & Ripple for their experience creating street games.

Ben Templeton, Creative Director for Thought Den, said: “We wanted to create an experience that is ‘heads-up’ – engaging people with the space, not just the screen on their phone. The live aspect of the game was designed to appeal to a new generation of museum-goers who have come to expect immersive media experiences. Why shouldn’t museums be the place to give them that?”

The app was built using HTML5 and JavaScript so it can be made available for the majority of smartphones. For launch the app can be downloaded on iOS only and an Android version will follow.

See www.capturethemuseum.com for more information.

Want to know even more? Hear Rosie and Ben talk about it in the video below:



Incitement is a 2 hour theatrical street game that throws the audience into the middle of a dystopian present world ruled by an Authority which knows everything about you and uses this to make your decisions for you (think 1984 in the Google age).
IN A WORLD WHERE….
BOOKS ARE BURNT MEMORIES ARE ALTERED CREATIVITY IS SUBCERSIVE & LOVE IS A COMMODITY
WHAT WOULD IT TAKE TO FIND YOUR VOICE?
The player audience joins one of four rebellious factions in their struggle to overthrow the Authority, but first they must compete in an underground inter-faction competition to decide who will get the all important “Platform’ to get their message heard by the masses.
All this must be done in stealth – the Authority’s watchful eyes are everywhere and anyone could be an informant.

The production has been inspired both by fantastic literature that has played with the theme of resistance to control and the extraordinary reawakening of crowd power across the world  in recent times; often enabled by social media. Facebook, Twitter and mobile phones will be key to the narrative of the experience both in the run up and during the game when text messaging and clever phone tech will be used.
Spread across the cityscape the gameplay involves plenty of sneaking, a bit of chasing and the need for stealthy tactics.
The use of theatre and an in depth back story creates a truly immersive game world where the audience’s actions, individually and collectively, affect the outcome of the experience; and we really don’t know which way it will go in the final rabble-rousing scene!
Incitement premiered in September 2012 as a headline game in Bristol’s Igfest on 8th Sep and London’s Hide & Seek Weekender on 15th Sep.

Incitement is a 2 hour theatrical street game that throws the audience into the middle of a dystopian present world ruled by an Authority which knows everything about you and uses this to make your decisions for you (think 1984 in the Google age).

IN A WORLD WHERE….

BOOKS ARE BURNT
MEMORIES ARE ALTERED
CREATIVITY IS SUBCERSIVE
& LOVE IS A COMMODITY

WHAT WOULD IT TAKE TO FIND YOUR VOICE?

The player audience joins one of four rebellious factions in their struggle to overthrow the Authority, but first they must compete in an underground inter-faction competition to decide who will get the all important “Platform’ to get their message heard by the masses.

All this must be done in stealth – the Authority’s watchful eyes are everywhere and anyone could be an informant.

The production has been inspired both by fantastic literature that has played with the theme of resistance to control and the extraordinary reawakening of crowd power across the world  in recent times; often enabled by social media. Facebook, Twitter and mobile phones will be key to the narrative of the experience both in the run up and during the game when text messaging and clever phone tech will be used.

Spread across the cityscape the gameplay involves plenty of sneaking, a bit of chasing and the need for stealthy tactics.

The use of theatre and an in depth back story creates a truly immersive game world where the audience’s actions, individually and collectively, affect the outcome of the experience; and we really don’t know which way it will go in the final rabble-rousing scene!

Incitement premiered in September 2012 as a headline game in Bristol’s Igfest on 8th Sep and London’s Hide & Seek Weekender on 15th Sep.

image


When the Art Fund nominated Holburne Museum in Bath first spoke to us about making a ‘mobile app game’ for their rather plush Sydney Gardens we asked what we thought was the most important question: “What kind of experience do you want the audience to take away with them?” This is because as real world game designers, we believe creating an enhanced experience of a space or place should be so much more than just another mobile app for a museum. The Holburne wanted people to experience the Garden in a different way and learn something about its past.
A game is perfect for this – people learn from the choices they make – but the real art is in also enabling them to understand the space on their own terms through a powerful experience which they are in control of. Our aim is to get under people’s skin – we create gen-u-ine, grade A, real experiences that effect people, with content that grabs them, brings them together and gives them something to go home and tell their mothers about. We do this through creating great stories with spectacle and drama at their heart that put people in the moment through creating genuine, visceral reaction.
Ghosts in the Garden saw Splash & Ripple injecting a flavour of this real-world viscerality into an intricately crafted audio geo-locative game. Present-day visitors meet and interact with real characters from the Gardens’ heyday, in a unique experience where history and imaginative play meet head-on.

Ghosts in the Garden - REACT 2012 from Silicon19 on Vimeo.

When the Art Fund nominated Holburne Museum in Bath first spoke to us about making a ‘mobile app game’ for their rather plush Sydney Gardens we asked what we thought was the most important question: “What kind of experience do you want the audience to take away with them?” This is because as real world game designers, we believe creating an enhanced experience of a space or place should be so much more than just another mobile app for a museum. The Holburne wanted people to experience the Garden in a different way and learn something about its past.

A game is perfect for this – people learn from the choices they make – but the real art is in also enabling them to understand the space on their own terms through a powerful experience which they are in control of. Our aim is to get under people’s skin – we create gen-u-ine, grade A, real experiences that effect people, with content that grabs them, brings them together and gives them something to go home and tell their mothers about. We do this through creating great stories with spectacle and drama at their heart that put people in the moment through creating genuine, visceral reaction.

Ghosts in the Garden saw Splash & Ripple injecting a flavour of this real-world viscerality into an intricately crafted audio geo-locative game. Present-day visitors meet and interact with real characters from the Gardens’ heyday, in a unique experience where history and imaginative play meet head-on.

Ghosts in the Garden - REACT 2012 from Silicon19 on Vimeo.

About:

* PURVEYORS OF FINE EXPERIENCES *

We like to create a bit of a splash; something that is remarkable, something that inspires excitement, intrigue and wonder in participants. This could take the form of mass participation events, theatrical encounters, pervasive or street games – you name it, we’ve done it.

When you experience something incredible you want to tell your friends about it – the splash has a ripple effect as people hear about what happened. This is where technology and analytics come in – to understand and measure the impact – and to help it ripple even further.

Splash & Ripple is a unique and innovative experience maker – spanning real and digital worlds.